What About Scene Safety?

December 28, 2012 § Leave a comment

Like the rest of you I have been horrified by the recent trend of violence against innocence. First the mass shooting in Newtown Connecticut and then the Christmas Eve shootings of the two firefighters, arriving at what they thought was a simple house fire. My heart is ripped out at the news like this. These two stories have been especially hard, not because the children killed in the Newtown were the same age as my oldest or because my own husband was on shift at the firehouse on Christmas Eve, but because of the media and the ensuing political debate that has arisen since these events.  I have seen the general public up and those new to the service up in arms over the safety of Fire and EMS at emergency operations.  My thought on this may not be the popular one.  All I can think is

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN?

In 1997 a secondary explosion at an abortion clinic was timed to go off after the first responders had arrived on scene and begun rescue operations. (http://cgi.cnn.com/US/9701/16/atlanta.blast.update/).  On January 31, 2009 a 25 year old EMT was shot and killed by a patient he was caring for (http://www.firerescue1.com/fire-ems/articles/450084-NY-EMT-shot-dead-by-patient/). Heck, a Google search of assault of EMT, EMT shot, or any other combination of words, brings up multiple articles.  If you read on the studies after 9/11/01, many believe that the plan was for the collapse of the building was to injure and kill the first responders.  In other words, our safety has always been a concern!

As an EMT instructor one of the first lectures I teach is scene safety. I teach personal well-being and personal safety, and each lecture begins with the reminder that you don’t approach unless the scene is safe. I’ve taken great classes on Situational Awareness, and personal protection that are designed to improve my personal safety, but I am also VERY aware of the fact that we can’t be prepared for everything.  What we do opens us up to the potential of unsafe situations. I was at a house fire where an irate home owner became overly aggressive with the firefighters, to the point that the pike pole was used to keep him at bay until law enforcement could step in.  Now, don’t get me wrong, there are situations where, no matter how much you do, you will not be able to prevent everything, but our focus should be on our personal safety, our crew’s safety, and then our ability to do the job. 

I truly believe that the media coverage of the recent shootings has been what brought this into so many minds. If you follow the website www.firefighterclosecalls.com you’ve seen the stories over the years regarding every shooting, almost shooting, or assault.  Bottom line is, we must ALWAYS be ready. We must always be prepared for a scene to go bad and we must do whatever we can go keep the belief that EVERYONE MUST GO HOME! 

Please don’t get me wrong, this is not a post to blame any of those who have been lost as a result of violence against them during emergencies. This is just a post to remind you that you must always have your eyes open, your mind open, and your body prepared to respond to the things that can arise at an emergency scene.  My thoughts tomorrow will be with those who are mourning the loss of their brother in Webster, NY, as they are every day with those who have lost loved ones in the line of duty and my prayers will continue to be that one day we can do our job without worrying about our safety being put into jeopardy by things we aren’t trained for!

Until next time…stay safe!

Where Am I?

You are currently viewing the archives for December, 2012 at Sticky Side Down.